Monday, July 21, 2014

Figure study 015

Figure 015a 14x14 charcoal on newsprint - Dave Casey - TheDailyPainter.jpg
Figure Drawing 015
©2014 Dave Casey
14x14" - Charcoal on newsprint
Price NFS

Another adventure into the world of figure drawing. I like this one, but I can see a couple of things I'll go back and change later. I like to let a piece of work sit and marinate for a day or so, someplace where I can see it. As I look it over I see the things that need work and then I go in and finish it.

Saturday, July 19, 2014

Figure study 014


Figure Drawing 014
©2014 Dave Casey
9x14" - Charcoal on newsprint
Price NFS

I have been doing a little work on my figure drawings and this was this evenings' effort. I did this while listening to The Savvy Painter podcast interview with Camille Przewodek. Very interesting and inspiring.

A couple of weeks ago Leslie Saeta announced another 30 in 30 painting challenge for this coming September and I've decided that I am going to do 30 figure drawings in charcoal and graphite. I've felt that my figure drawing skills are a bit lacking and I am looking to improve by doing a drawing each day for a month. I'll do some pieces leading up to September and then hit the ground running the first day of the challenge.

Friday, July 18, 2014

Friday Memoirs - Tim's Vermeer

 A Pair of Peaches
(Just received back from an exhibition)
©2013 Dave Casey
6x6" - oil on gessobord
Price $100 - Framed

I read a post today on The Painter's Keys that really got me going. It concerned a film called Tim's Vemeer.  It seems that a man named Tim, a man with no artist training at all, decided that he could reproduce a Vermeer and the process was filmed.  I got a little fired up about the post and I burned up the keys on my keyboard writing the following reply.

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I'm sorry, but I don't see anything that even remotely looks like a Vermeer in Tim's painting.  As one person stated, he was trying avoid making an exact copy to avoid the the label of forgery, but I don't buy that at all.  Plenty of things could have been changed to avoid that, such as size.  The original is about 29x25 inches, so Tim could have done a copy of about 24x20 inches.  He could have done a mirror image painting being as how he was working from a photo in the first place.

Quite obviously there are a lot of problems with the painting that have already been brought up, such as the back of the dress of the woman, the position of the man's hands, the lighting, the colors, the floor and more.  I mean, look at the fringe on the tapestry that is draped over the table in the Vermeer.  It looks like Vermeer spent considerable time to get that fringe to look just right.  Tim's looks like he got bored and just painted in the fringe as fast as he could, just to get it finished.

David Hockney can swoon all over Tim's painting all he wants, but I've never had much respect for Hockney and his hack conclusions that are now being taught at the college level in art history classes.  And Tim's remark that an artist can not see the fall off of light on a wall as the light comes in through a window and then fades across the wall, that was just pure hogwash.  Almost any artist with any amount of experience can see light gradations like that and those that can't see it at first, can see it very quickly with a little bit of teaching from another artist.  And you don't need a photograph to see it, you just need to open your eyes.

This post has set my teeth to grinding and people like Hockney are the reason for this.  It is just another attempt from the "modern art" crowd to try to tear down the work of the masters, to try to say that what they accomplished wasn't all that magical and special.

I had a conversation with another artist a couple of years ago and we were discussing the use of tracing and we came to the conclusion that, even if you sat a novice down with a Di Vinci drawing and a light table, they still wouldn't be able to make a copy that would look anything like the original.  Tim would have had a better chance at his quest if he had had a giclee made of The Music Lesson and then painted over the top of that, but I'm pretty sure he would come up short in that attempt, too.

Sorry Tim.  Your copy looks about like the effort of a first year high school art student and it looks nothing like a Vermeer.

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<Rant mode: OFF>

Saturday, July 12, 2014

Valley of the Flowers

Landscape - Valley of the Flowers 001a 5x7 oil on linen panel - Dave Casey - TheDailyPainter.jpg
Valley of the Flowers
©2014 Dave Casey
5x7" - oil on linen panel

Looks like the road to the "ole fishin' hole" is in full bloom. I can hear the tailgate on grandpa's old truck just rattling along was we made our way down the dirt road to the small lake on the other side of the hill. 

Landscape - Valley of the Flowers 001a 5x7 oil on linen panel - Dave Casey - TheDailyPainter.jpg

Friday, July 11, 2014

Bluebell Highway

Landscape - Bluebell Highway 001a 5x7 oil on linen panel - Dave Casey - TheDailyPainter.jpg
Bluebell Highway
©2014 Dave Casey
5x7" - oil on linen panel

Here's another country road painting. A springtime drive in the country will usually bring about sights of wild flowers on most roadsides. Texas is known for its bluebells along the roads, along with the occasional poppy here and there. 

Landscape - Bluebell Highway 001a 5x7 oil on linen panel - Dave Casey - TheDailyPainter.jpg

Monday, July 7, 2014

Days of Wine and Grapes ver. 2.0

Days of Wine and Grapes ver. 2.0 001a 12x12 oil on stretched canvas - Dave Casey - TheDailyPainter.com.jpg
Days of Wine and Grapes ver. 2.0
©2014 Dave Casey
12x12" - oil on stretched canvas - $165

This is the second of two paintings I'm sending into an exhibition next week and it is a revisit to a painting I did a couple of years ago, that also sold through an exhibition. That one, the original was a 6x6" and this one is 12x12". I have always liked the way the bottle disappeared into the background. I'm betting this one will sell at the exhibition, too.  I am considering doing another version of this painting, but going really big.  I have some 24x36" canvases and I think this would look great on one.

As with the Yellow Headed Blackbird painting, if you decide you want this painting, you better make it quick. It is going into an exhibition towards the end of the month and will be sent in the next ten days or so. 


Days of Wine and Grapes ver. 2.0 001a 12x12 oil on stretched canvas - Dave Casey - TheDailyPainter.com.jpg

Sunday, July 6, 2014

Yellow Headed Blackbird

Yellow Headed Blackbird 001a 12x12 oil on stretched canvas - Dave Casey - TheDailyPainter.com.jpg
Yellow Headed Blackbird 001
©2014 Dave Casey
12x12" - oil on stretched canvas - $165

Honey Bunny and I were out for a stroll around Railroad Lake, here in Las Vegas. As usual, I was doing a little bird watching and grabbing photos when I could. Towards the south end of the lake there is a thicket of cattails and reeds about thirty feet off shore and I could hear some kind of bird making a racket in there. But I couldn't see him.

After waiting patiently (me, not Honey Bunny) he showed himself near the tops of the reeds. It was this yellow headed blackbird, just singing and squawking and having a good time. Oh, and hanging on for dear life because it was quite breezy that day. He kept trying to hide from me, behind reeds and cattails, but my camera is quicker than he thought, so I did get a couple of decent shots of him out of the fifty or so pictures I took. 


Oh, if you decide you want this painting, you better make it quick.  It is going into an exhibition towards the end of the month and will be sent in the next ten days or so.

Yellow Headed Blackbird 001a 12x12 oil on stretched canvas - Dave Casey - TheDailyPainter.com.jpg

Saturday, July 5, 2014

Kitchen Painting - Apples 002

Kitchen Painting - Apples 002a 8x10 oil on linen panel - Dave Casey - TheDailyPainter.jpg
Kitchen Painting - Apples 002
©2014 Dave Casey
8x10" - oil on linen panel
Click here to go to the Daily Paintworks auction page

There is nothing more relaxing than picking up a paint brush and turning on some long-playing music video on YouTube and whiling away about three or four hours. Especially when there are quite a few 8-10 hour long videos with relaxing piano music, classical music, jazz or any other kind of music you may be in the mood for. 

Kitchen Painting - Apples 002a 8x10 oil on linen panel - Dave Casey - TheDailyPainter.jpg

Friday, July 4, 2014

Friday Memoirs - To Sketch or Not to Sketch.

Kitchen Painting - Apple, Grapes and Cherries
©2014 Dave Casey
6x6" - oil on gessobord - $40
Click here to go to check out my Etsy store.

As with a lot of artists, I struggle with the idea of whether I should sketch my ideas before setting brush to canvas. There are plenty of times when I just want to pick up a brush and start slopping paint on the canvas and see where my brush leads me. There are times when this approach can work and there are times when the finished canvas will make great kindling in the fireplace. But, no matter the outcome, the process is going to be fun.

When doing a figurative work, it is obviously desirable to start with a quick sketch. Getting proportions correct and all the parts placed properly is what is going to make a good portrait or figure painting a great piece of art. If these elements are not what they should be, the whole piece is going to suffer in the end. Unless, of course, you're trying to become the next Picasso. Then you can put body parts wherever you want and in whatever size you want because it really won't make a difference.

Even when doing a landscape I will do a bit of sketching, usually with either a watered down wash of color or a piece of vine charcoal. I guess I have Jerry Yarnell to thank for that. He and Brenda Harris are quite big on beginning with a sketch directly on your canvas. It is a difference that I noticed between these two and Bob Ross (one of my heroes, by the way). Bob would just start plastering paint wherever he damn well pleased and he made it work. But, he also worked from an image in his mind and that image would change as the painting progressed. But, if you're going to be painting from a reference photo or on location, this methodology rarely works and there is nothing worse that getting a good ways into your masterpiece and finding out that the elements of this work aren't going to fit on the canvas.

Now, when I say it's a good idea to sketch in your ideas before attacking the canvas with a brush I mean sketch, not draw. There is a difference. Sketching a 16x20 canvas shouldn't take more than a minute, with an extra minute to step back and take a long look at the canvas and making whatever adjustments are necessary. And that is a critical step. Step back and get a good look at the canvas from a distance. It took me awhile to learn this little item. It would be nothing for me to sit down at the easel and not get up for the next two or three hours, never once getting a view of the painting from a distance. And these are some of the most boring paintings I've ever done.

If you’re worried that your sketch may show through your transparent glazes, then use charcoal as your sketch medium and after getting the sketch on the canvas, take a fine, soft two inch brush and dry brush the canvas. It will take most of the charcoal off the canvas, but leave just enough for you to see what you are doing.

Sketching will help with your composition also. How many paintings have you seen where it looked like the artist just started painting and put everything they could think of in the painting and didn’t appear to care where they put those items? How many paintings have you seen where the artist appears to have not understood the idea of a focus point and proper placement of that focus point? Sketching is one way to work these bits of the composition puzzle out beforehand.

One contemporary artist that uses sketching quite well is the acrylic painter, Roger Bansemer. Check out some of his videos and you will see how he can take a small piece of wood and sketch out his plein air scene beforehand.

So, if you are finding that your paintings aren’t coming together the way you like, try sketching your ideas on the canvas first and see what happens. You might be surprised with the results.

Keep on sketching and take care.

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

Kitchen Painting -Lemon 004

Kitchen Painting - Lemon 004a 5x5 oil on gessobord - Dave Casey - TheDailyPainter.jpg
Kitchen Painting -Lemon 004
©2014 Dave Casey
5x5" - oil on gessobord
Click here to go to the Daily Paintworks auction page

Gotta love those lemons. If you were to ask the average person, "what color is this lemon," most would say yellow. Ask an artist and there will be a multitude of answers because we all see things differently.

This reminds me of the scene in the movie Local Color where Nicolai asks John, "what color are those clouds?" John replies that they are white, whereupon Nicolai cusses him and pulls a handkerchief from his pocket and throws it on the ground. "This is white, now what color are the clouds." This is when John's eyes are opened to the colors around him, when he sees blues, greys, pinks and yellows in the clouds. 


Kitchen Painting - Lemon 004a 5x5 oil on gessobord - Dave Casey - TheDailyPainter.jpg